Saturday, September 9, 2017

A Girl, a Book and a Tree

Heathcliff, you were
a dark figure of romance
who taught me
that love equals pain and loss.

But oh, Francie,
lit up in the window,
your arm arced overhead,
as you prepared
for your evening out,
your friend, the old tree, outside,
it was you who taught  me
to dream!


For Magaly's prompt at Real Toads, to write about what a book meant to you in 132 words or less. I used 50. When I was 13, Wuthering Heights was a book with great impact, but it was A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, that really spoke to my circumstances, and offered me hope,  a way up and out.

16 comments:

  1. Your 50 words were quite eloquent enough to make your point, Sherry. Well said!

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  2. Who doesn't love a book that remind us that dreams are what feed life into our existence? Yum.

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  3. I loved a Tree Grows in Brooklyn. I reread it a couple of years ago and it was just as good as when I was 14. we all need dreams and this book was so full of hope. Your 50 words are truly perfection.

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  4. I read a Tree Grows in Brooklyn ages ago (I was inspired to pick it up after seeing the title featured in a cartoon). I think I need to revisit it again.

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  5. Words and feeling brought to life. You did it well. Sherry.

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  6. Two very different loves. I can see the appeal of each.

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  7. Love the contrast between the books, and how you put me on the moor with Heathcliff,

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  8. Small is beautiful. Hebden Bridge, where I spend some of my time, is very close to the moors where Wuthering Heights was set. A bleak but mesmerising landscape.

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  9. I toyed with an acrostic poem about Wuthering Heights but it would have been too much. I like your short, sweet homage and love the way you have combined two beloved books, Sherry. I agree with you about Heathcliff as 'a dark figure of romance
    who taught me
    that love equals pain and loss'.
    I came late to A Tree Grows... I think I appreciated it more than I would have done as a teenager living in England and Germany.

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  10. The one i stuck to and kept rereading in high school days was The Scarlet Pimpernel

    much love...

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  11. Whistles!💖 Couldn't have done it better myself! This is beautifully heartfelt, Sherry!💖

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  12. Old gloomysides that I am, I've read Wuthering Heights, but not the other. perhaps I should.

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  13. Both books equally transforming. You have captured them beautifully here, Sherry.

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  14. Read Wuthering Heights when I was about 28 - and loved it! I have "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" on my bookshelf - unread. I will have to get it down!

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  15. Ah, lovely--I loved both books. So cool, thanks. k.

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  16. Nice take! It's a lovely theme.

    Wuthering Heights was a tough read for me. So tough that I couldn't finish. Haven't read A Tree Grows In Brooklyn. I'm not fond of classics. But, I like the way you have compared these two books here. :)

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Thank you so much. I will be over to see you soon!